Economic Analysis


Economic aspects increasingly permeate the legal landscape. In today’s complex global business and regulatory environment, Sidley’s Economic Analysis team offers clients competent advice that enables them to address their unique challenges. We provide clients with economic analysis and empirical insight across numerous legal disciplines and industries. ebay

Sidley’s economists offer guidance on legal and policy matters whenever a high level of economic knowledge is required. Our team of Ph.D.-trained economists works closely with our lawyers to develop innovative solutions in the following ways:

  • Adding quantitative rigor to and developing the economic angles of legal arguments by leveraging state-of-the-art analytical techniques.
  • Keeping clients involved in economic goal-setting and communicating complex analysis to clients and courts in an accessible fashion. We put great effort and care into data visualization techniques and the presentation of results.
  • Providing economic assistance throughout the entire legal process. This includes litigation support, expert selection and management, advocacy and negotiation support, training and education, and industry knowledge.
  • Delivering outstanding economic services in a wide variety of legal areas, including international trade, intellectual property, complex litigation, regulation, life sciences, finance, antitrust, M&A and commercial arbitration, among others.
  • Supporting clients in a variety of fora, including the World Trade Organization, domestic courts, regulatory and administrative agencies, and arbitral tribunals.

Our work; representative matters

Sidley’s economists have successfully completed many economic assignments on behalf of our clients. Select recent successes include:

  • Assisting the Government of Brazil in securing a US$750 million retaliation award against the United States in the WTO dispute US – Upland Cotton
  • Advising a client in an international commercial arbitration proceedings before the ICC involving one of the largest and most important state-owned enterprises in Central Asia. Our economists handled evidence discovery and generation, the formulation of claims and defenses, and damage calculation. The arbitration tribunal ultimately awarded our client monetary compensation amounting to US$275 million, and fully rejected a counterclaim of roughly US$800 million.
  • Running a multi-year project for PayPal to research the benefits of innovative financial payment tools for small and medium enterprises (SMEs), charitable organizations, and person-to-person transfers (such as remittances). Our work output helped PayPal to position itself as a thought leader in digital economic policy issues.
  • Conducting a multi-year project for eBay Inc. with the aim of assessing the impact of e-commerce and internet marketplaces on economic growth and development worldwide. We quantified the significant role that e-commerce plays for consumers in remote and under-developed areas, for small and medium enterprises worldwide, and for economic development and employment at large. This led eBay Inc. to position itself as a global enabler of cross-border trade and economic growth. The results of the project also received significant media coverage and favorable feedback from thought leaders and the academic community.

About the team

Sidley’s economists are experienced professionals with advanced degrees from leading universities. We are active participants in the economic community and have made contributions to top-level academic publications. We regularly assume speaking and teaching engagements, as well as pro bono assignments. 

We also maintain a roster of outside experts, many of whom are among the most distinguished professionals in their respective economic subfields, including statistics, econometrics, modeling or applied theory. Drawing from an international network of industry associates and thought leaders with strong ties to academia, our team is well situated to assist global clients. 

Economic aspects increasingly permeate the legal landscape. In today’s complex global business and regulatory environment, Sidley’s Economic Analysis team offers clients competent advice that enables them to address their unique challenges. We provide clients with economic analysis and empirical insight across numerous legal disciplines and industries. ebay

Sidley’s economists offer guidance on legal and policy matters whenever a high level of economic knowledge is required. Our team of Ph.D.-trained economists works closely with our lawyers to develop innovative solutions in the following ways:

  • Adding quantitative rigor to and developing the economic angles of legal arguments by leveraging state-of-the-art analytical techniques.
  • Keeping clients involved in economic goal-setting and communicating complex analysis to clients and courts in an accessible fashion. We put great effort and care into data visualization techniques and the presentation of results.
  • Providing economic assistance throughout the entire legal process. This includes litigation support, expert selection and management, advocacy and negotiation support, training and education, and industry knowledge.
  • Delivering outstanding economic services in a wide variety of legal areas, including international trade, intellectual property, complex litigation, regulation, life sciences, finance, antitrust, M&A and commercial arbitration, among others.
  • Supporting clients in a variety of fora, including the World Trade Organization, domestic courts, regulatory and administrative agencies, and arbitral tribunals.

Our work; representative matters

Sidley’s economists have successfully completed many economic assignments on behalf of our clients. Select recent successes include:

  • Assisting the Government of Brazil in securing a US$750 million retaliation award against the United States in the WTO dispute US – Upland Cotton
  • Advising a client in an international commercial arbitration proceedings before the ICC involving one of the largest and most important state-owned enterprises in Central Asia. Our economists handled evidence discovery and generation, the formulation of claims and defenses, and damage calculation. The arbitration tribunal ultimately awarded our client monetary compensation amounting to US$275 million, and fully rejected a counterclaim of roughly US$800 million.
  • Running a multi-year project for PayPal to research the benefits of innovative financial payment tools for small and medium enterprises (SMEs), charitable organizations, and person-to-person transfers (such as remittances). Our work output helped PayPal to position itself as a thought leader in digital economic policy issues.
  • Conducting a multi-year project for eBay Inc. with the aim of assessing the impact of e-commerce and internet marketplaces on economic growth and development worldwide. We quantified the significant role that e-commerce plays for consumers in remote and under-developed areas, for small and medium enterprises worldwide, and for economic development and employment at large. This led eBay Inc. to position itself as a global enabler of cross-border trade and economic growth. The results of the project also received significant media coverage and favorable feedback from thought leaders and the academic community.

About the team

Sidley’s economists are experienced professionals with advanced degrees from leading universities. We are active participants in the economic community and have made contributions to top-level academic publications. We regularly assume speaking and teaching engagements, as well as pro bono assignments. 

We also maintain a roster of outside experts, many of whom are among the most distinguished professionals in their respective economic subfields, including statistics, econometrics, modeling or applied theory. Drawing from an international network of industry associates and thought leaders with strong ties to academia, our team is well situated to assist global clients. 

Experience

Publications

  • “The Role of Economics in WTO Dispute Settlement and Choosing the Right Litigation Strategy – A Practitioner’s View,” C. Lau and S. Schropp; in: Carpenter, T.; Jansen, M.; and J. Pauwelyn (eds.), The Use of Economics in International Trade and Investment Disputes, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (forthcoming, October 2016) 
  • “Rights of Passage: The Economic Effects of Raising the de minimis Threshold in Canada”, Olim Latipov, Christine McDaniel, and Simon Schropp, E-Brief, C.D. Howe Institute (June 23, 2016)
  • “Filling the Gap: How Technology Is Enabling Access to Finance for Underserved Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises”, U. Ahmed, T. Beck, C. McDaniel, S. Schropp, Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, Vol. 10, Issue 3/4: 35-48
  • “There Goes Gravity: How eBay Reduces Trade Costs,” A. Lendle, M. Olarreaga, S. Schropp, P.-L. Vézina, Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Vol. 126, Issue 591, 2016: 406–441; previously published as CEPR Discussion Paper no. 9094. London, Centre for Economic Policy Research; reprinted as World Bank Policy Research Working Paper no. WPS 6253. Washington, D.C., The World Bank (2012)
  • “The Asian Challenge for Australian Agriculture: Turning Reputation into Dollars,” V. Lipton C. McDaniel, B. Mitra-Kahn, Australian Government, Department of Industry, Australian Innovation System Report 2014 (Dec. 2014)
  • “Can the WTO Adapt to a World Where Everyone Is Empowered to Engage in Global Trade?”, U. Ahmed, A. Lendle, H. Melin, S. Schropp in: Evenett, S. and A. Jara (eds.) Building on Bali: A Work Programme for the WTO, 2013, VoxEU.org eBook (2014)
  • “Intellectual Property in the Australian Economy: Evidence and Issues,” C. McDaniel, in Flashpoints: Changing Paradigms in Intellectual Property and Technology Law, ed. by A. George, Quid Pro Quo Law, forthcoming (2015)
  • “eBay’s anatomy,” A. Lendle, M. Olarreaga, S. Schropp, P.-L. Vézina, Economics Letters, Vol. 121, Issue 1, Pages 115–120 (October 2013)
  • “Commentary on the Appellate Body Report in Australia—Apples (DS367): Judicial Review in the Face of Uncertainty,” S. Schropp, World Trade Review (2012); also published in Henrik Horn and Petros C. Mavroidis (eds.), The WTO Case Law of 2010 Legal and Economic Analysis, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2012)
  • “Tribunal Specialization and Institutional Targeting in Patent Enforcement,” C. McDaniel, D. Somaya, Organization Science 23: 869-887 (May/June 2012)
  • “Outsourcing and Competition Policy,” C. Beverelli, K. Mahlstein, Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Vol. 11, Issue 2, Pages 131–147 (2011)
  • “Study on the Economic Impact of TRIPS-Plus Free Trade Agreements,” A. Koff, L. Baughman, J. Francois, C. McDaniel, prepared for the International Intellectual Property Institute and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, D.C. (August 2011)
  • “Commentary on the Appellate Body Report in EC—Bananas III (21.5): Waiver-Thin, or Lock, Stock and Metric Ton?”, David Palmeter, S. Schropp, World Trade Review (2010)
  • “The Law, Economics, and Politics of Retaliation in WTO Dispute Settlement,” S. Schropp, in: Bown, C. and J. Pauwelyn (eds.), The Law, Economics, and Politics of Trade Sanctions in the WTO, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (January 2010)
  • “Services Liberalization and Computable General Equilibrium Modeling: Beyond Tariff Equivalents,” T. Fukui , C. McDaniel, Journal of International Commerce and Economics (February 2010) 
  • “Trade Policy Flexibility and Enforcement in the WTO: A Law & Economics Analysis,” S. Schropp, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (September 2009)
  • “Comments on the CRA Paper Entitled ‘An Economic Analysis of the Use of Selective Distribution by Luxury Goods Suppliers,’” S. Kinsella, H. Melin, S. Schropp, European Competition Law Journal (April 2009)
  • “Vertical Restraints and Competition Policy—Internet Sales, a New Dimension to be Considered,” K. Mahlstein, Antitrust Chronicle, Competition Policy International, Vol. 3 (2009)
  • “(R)ice Age: Comments on the Panel Report in Turkey—Measures Affecting The Importation of Rice,” D. Gantz, S. Schropp, World Trade Review, Vol. 8(1): 145-177; also published in Horn, H. and P. Mavroidis (eds.): “The Case Law of 2006—The American Law Institute Reporters” Studies on WTO Law, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (July 2008)
  • Tools of the Trade: Models for Trade Policy Analysis, C. McDaniel, K. Reinert and K. Hughes (eds.), Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C. (January 2008)
  • “Indisputably essential: The Economics of Dispute Settlement Institutions in Trade Agreements,” A. Keck, S. Schropp, Journal of World Trade, Vol. 41(2): 411-450 (2007)
  • “The Case for Tariff Compensation in WTO Dispute Settlement,” S. Schropp, Aussenwirtschaft (Swiss Review of International Economic Relations), Vol. 2005-IV: 485-528 (2005)
  • “The NAFTA Tariff Preference and U.S.-Mexico Trade,” L. Agama, C. McDaniel, The World Economy, Vol. 26, no. 7 (2003) 
  • “A Review of Armington Trade Substitution Elasticities,” E. Balistreri, C. McDaniel, Economie Internationale, Vol. 94-95 (2003) 
  • “Short- and Long-Run U.S. Industry-Level Armington Elasticity Estimates,” M. Gallaway, C. McDaniel, S. Rivera, North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Vol. 14, no. 1 (2003) 
  • “A Decomposition of North American Trade Growth since NAFTA,” R. Hillberry, C. McDaniel, U.S. ITC International Economic Review (May/June 2002) 
  • “Engineers on the Production Floor?”, B. Smarzynska Javorcik, C. McDaniel, The World Economy, Vol. 24, no. 6 (June 2001) 
  • “Impacts of the Japanese Patent System on Productivity Growth,” K. Maskus, C. McDaniel, Japan and the World Economy, Vol. 11, no. 4 (2000)